This Poetry Thing

I am still learning about this poetry thing.

A few weeks ago, L.L. Barkat posted about an interesting verse form called the Villanelle, and challenged us to try our own.

I was a bit intimidated at that time, but since have been reading The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms with my boys. There is nothing like teaching something to children to give one courage to jump on in.

Just a refresher:

A Villanelle…

1) Is a poem of nineteen lines.

2)Has five stanzas, each of three lines, with a final one of four lines.

3)The first line of the first stanza is repeated as the last line of the second and fourth stanzas.

4)The third line of the first stanza is repeated as the last line of the third and fifth stanzas.

5)These two refrain lines follow each other to become the second-to-last and last lines of the poem.

6)The rhyme scheme is aba. The rhymes are repeated according to the refrains.

(The Making of a Poem: A Norton Anthology of Poetic Forms by Strand and Boland)

So here is my Villanelle!

A New Beginning

They are painting all her walls.

A fresh new start, or so they say

Each stroke covers gaping flaws.

With each day, night also falls

Her old life now has passed away

They are painting all her walls.

Like a ghost she trails down halls

Colors dreams whose edges fray

Each stroke covers gaping flaws.

She says she doesn’t care at all

Her heart is just a piece of clay

They are painting all her walls.

Her fists are clenched in tiny balls

Her lips tell lies that she will stay

They are painting all her walls…

Each stroke covers gaping flaws.

Comments

  1. says

    I love the way the repetition works in this form of poetry. Thanks for sharing your villanelle – very evocative images…

  2. says

    We had great fun in our homeschool learning the villanelle form too. That book is just so excellent.

    I love this poem you wrote. It chills and thrills me. And I don’t say that kind of thing often!

  3. says

    I am impressed. I had no idea what a villanelle was when I read that word in your post. The explanation didn’t help much either. But, when I read your poem I thought, “I’ve read these kind of poems before.” Good job. You wrote a good poem and taught an English lit lesson with it!

  4. says

    I agree with Warren. I had no idea what the poem would be like, by the description. It just made me more confused. Until I read yours… then it all made sense. I guess I need examples! 🙂

    This was really wonderful!

  5. says

    Oh, my head spins trying to follow directions, of any kind, but especially those related to creativity. You clearly have shows me that certain “confines” are liberating instead. Wonderful poem!

    Blessings.

  6. Rain says

    This is a lovely villanelle Laura, I’m really impressed and inspired because it seems quite complicated! 🙂

  7. says

    a reflection of my own life so may times… thankful though that it is Grace that i find in the paint can.

    your poetry is moving and inspiring.

  8. says

    okay, I’m not sure what happened. But I wanted to tell you that I have read this poem again and again, it is poignant and mysterious…

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