Playdates With God: Happy Feet

“There’s something about sitting on the front porch eating a Bomb Pop that makes it feel like anything is possible,” I say to him as I study that sweet miracle that is the red-white-and blue pop. The red is sweating, just a little, and promising just the right refreshment on this hot summer evening.

He nods, but doesn’t elaborate, and I wonder when the last time was he has felt that way.

Anything is possible.

“Your toes look funny,” he says, and when I look, I see that they do.

We have this ongoing foot thing—he teases me about mine because I like to pick things up with them. His? Useless. They just stand there. But the first time I saw them bared? That’s when I fell in love with him. One of my friends even wrote a poem about it.

This is what we do. When he gets back from an evening run, we sit on the porch and eat a Bomb Pop. Sometimes the boys join us. Sometimes the dog. But lately, it’s just been the two of us.

And it feels right. Because, you know—where two or more gather? And things are changing…what with boys that grow. I have a feeling that it’s going to be just the two of us a lot.

It’s a good thing I like him. And his feet.

How about you? How do you embrace the God-joy? Every Monday I’ll be sharing one of my Playdates with God. I would love to hear about yours. It can be anything: outside, quiet time. Maybe it’s solitary. Maybe it’s loud and crowded. Just find Him. Be with Him. And come tell us about it.

Grab my button at the bottom of the page and join us:


Sharing with L.L. Barkat today also:

On In Around button

Looking for a good summer read? Join us over at The High Calling for our new book club–which starts today–on Luci Shaw’s Breath for the Bones: Art, Imagination, and Spirit: Reflections on Creativity and Faith

Comments

  1. says

    Laura,
    Bomb pops take me back to ice cream trucks…where did all the good ice cream truck go? They aren’t in my neighborhood.

    Your words are always poetry.

  2. says

    Isn’t it funny, how we look back and see that it’s naked feet or something like them that pulls love out of us and fills us with it all at once?

    Bomb pops on the porch.

    Life is good.

  3. says

    Laura, that is so funny! Charles teases me about picking up stuff with my toes, too! (I do it so that I won’t get my hands dirty—picking up a stray dirty sock to put in the laundry basket, or a stray used tissue that missed the trash can.) But it’s more difficult in wintertime, don’t you think (because of the socks)? 😉

    I read that poem by LL. TOTALLY made my day. Thanks to you both for making me smile.

  4. says

    Bomb Pop… 🙂 (our kids call them rocket pops)

    What a beautiful post…no really. Soft, quiet, and sentimental..with a touch of reality and grace.

    It’s almost surreal and yet so tangible.

    You are blessed and a blessing. (feet and all).

    For nothing will be impossible with God….(Luke 1:37)

  5. says

    I love bomb pops! They are just the taste of summer. My mom bought me a whole box the summer I got my tonsils out. I have a friend who was born with no arms. He plays cello with his toes. Doesn’t God allow us to do simply amazing things with the bodies he gave us?

    It’s good to be back in blog world. Missed you!

  6. says

    My daughter picks up things with her toes. I thought she was crazy. Perhaps she’s just like you. 🙂

    I seriously need a play date with my husband. Summer is so hard.

    P.S. word verification: bellys

  7. says

    Growing kids. . . time for the two of you. . . I can relate to the surprise of these moments happening a bit more. Although, just yesterday I was a little girl who always, ALWAYS chose a Bomb Pop when standing at the ice cream truck. Time. . .
    And the feet/love connection:) Melted me faster than a bomb pop would melt on my scorching front porch at the moment. You know, if you can love someone’s feet, oh my goodness that is love. Obviously.
    (I had a playdate this week and I’m really, really hoping to write about it soon. Made me happy to read yours though.)

  8. says

    this is so cool Laura…I was just saying to my oldest daughter that I wished the ice cream truck would come around..I wanted a red, white and blue bomb pop! I ate them as a kid … they were my favorite.
    I loved reading about you and your man talking feet and eating bomb pops…what more could you ask for?;)
    xo

  9. says

    Now I need a Bomb pop.

    And I’m awfully glad he loves me, bunions and all.

    We had a speaker at church once who had no arms. He was able to do all kinds of things with his feet–feed himself with a fork, drop coins in the slots on the bus. Now there was an inspiration!

  10. says

    Cool Pop for a warm day! How Refreshing! Enjoyed your story. It is amazing that God considers our FEET Beautiful! Especially if we take the Gospel to others in word or in deed. 🙂

  11. says

    My husband’s side of the family all have crazy long toes and can pinch like mad. I, on the other hand, have useless toes. My kids all got Daddy’s so I am left defenseless.
    Just found your blog and so happy that I did! Linking up for the first time as well.
    grace and peace to you,
    cheryl

  12. says

    Such a sweet post. It’s these everyday times that makes life so beautiful.

    I just bought the bomb pops for my grandchildren. Do you know how many questions a 5 and 7 year old can ask about those simple red/white/blue pops? Too many to count!

  13. says

    I have dextrous toes, as well, and I’m rather pleased with their ability to grip and pluck things from the floor.

    But I get kinda grossed out by feet in general, not really wanting to ponder them for long and definitely not wanting them touching me.

  14. says

    ha.

    i have cool toes too.

    mine are used all the time for cool things like picking up fallen underwear.

    wait.

    delete.

    no, i won’t.

    it’s 1:55 am in the morning, and obviously, i’m unstable.

    goodnight, laura.

    just read the last 3 posts of your blog. you’re one of my favorites. 🙂

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