The Sabbath of Sabbaths (and a winner!)

IMG_6918

Last night at sundown, Jews around the world ushered in Yom Kippur—the Day of Atonement. In Leviticus 16:29, God mandated this holy day on the tenth day of the seventh month of the Hebrew calendar as the day of atonement for sins. Yom Kippur is called the Sabbath of Sabbaths because Leviticus 23:27 decrees it as a strict day of rest.

When I realized the significance of the day, I called one of my Jewish friends and asked if he would take me to Temple with him. “Oh, Laura,” he said. “You don’t want to go to that service. It’s soo long. And it’s all in Hebrew. You’ll be bored to tears.”

So I started reading more about Yom Kippur, falling down so many happy little rabbit trails, delighting in feeding an endless curiosity about the roots of my faith. Jewish traditions are fascinating.

I learned that, according to Jewish tradition, on Rosh Hashanah, which is the first day of the seventh month on the Hebrew calendar and considered the start of the Jewish New Year, God writes names into the Book of Life and waits until Yom Kippur to “seal” a fate of life or death. There is a ten-day period between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur, known as The Days of Awe, in which individuals seek forgiveness for wrongs done against God and people, and try to influence the sealing of their fate. This is done through prayer (of repentance), fasting, and giving to charity.

The span of the twenty-five hours of Yom Kippur, from sundown on Tuesday to Sundown on Wednesday, are set aside for public and private petitions and confessions of guilt. At the end of Yom Kippur, one hopes that they have been forgiven by God.

As I read about the traditions of Yom Kippur, I couldn’t let go of the idea of attending the service. I found a reformed Jewish congregation nearby and called their office (surely this service would be in English?). I told the nice man who answered the phone that I was interested in attending their Yom Kippur service that evening but I am not Jewish. Is that something he would recommend?

“I want to say that anyone is welcome to come to any service at any time,” he said, and I heard a cautionary note in his voice. “But generally we recommend to people who are visiting to come to our Friday Shabbat services. A Rosh Hashanah or a Yom Kippur service would tend to run very long and could be a bit overwhelming. But you are welcome to come any time.”

I acceded defeat.

So I finished up my workday and drove on home, where I read more about the traditions associated with Yom Kippur.

  1. No eating or drinking
  2. No wearing leather shoes
  3. No bathing or washing
  4. No perfumes or lotions
  5. No marital relations

It is customary to wear white on Yom Kippur, which symbolizes purity and reminds that our sins shall be made as white as snow. Some people wear a kittel, the white robe in which the dead are buried.

I could go on and on.

I spent some time in prayer, repenting personally and for my community. And when my husband came home from work, we took a long walk in the last receding light of day. The falling sun bathed everything in amber and I felt my soul shift into a holy place. I imagined Jesus in the synagogue with his family—Jesus the boy, Jesus the young man, Jesus my Lord—ushering in Yom Kippur with prayer and song. I felt a rush of gratitude that my salvation rests in his hands, not my own. I felt a rush of gratitude that all these rules have been replaced by grace.

And this morning when I awakened, still flush with the love of this high holy day, even though I couldn’t make this a strict day of rest, I felt rest in my heart. And I remembered what Mark Buchanan said in a panel discussion with Ann Voskamp and Dr. Bruce Hindmarsh: Sabbath is a heart attitude.

And this makes me smile.

Shelly Miller’s new book Rhythms of Rest is all about how Sabbath is a heart attitude. I’m glad to give a copy of her lovely book (along with a couple others in the bundle) to:  Sharon O.! Yay! Congratulations, Sharon. You can email me your snail at laraj@suddenlink.net and I’ll get these out to you ASAP!

img_8732

Comments

  1. says

    Our faith roots always speak to my spirit too, Laura. As I was reading this I felt so overwhelmed with gratitude that I don’t have to DO anything to TRY to influence the sealing of my fate. Christ and done it all. It is finished. Glory ! and Amen! (Congratulations, Sharon!)

  2. says

    Laura,
    I love how you follow those rabbit trails and draw closer to God. In my OT Survey class in seminary, I love learning about the Jewish roots of our faith because it is so needed to fully appreciate God and all of his gifts 🙂

  3. says

    I enjoyed your enthusiasm and article concerning Yom Kippor. Today my Jewish friends from out of town stopped by between the two services held at the Jewish church in our town. They were fasting, but not wearing white or abstaining from leather shoes. I grew up in a kind of rare Christian church that kept all the Old Testament / Jewish festivals, yet believed in Christ. I enjoy talking to my friend about how they keep their festivals and how we kept ours (we called ours Day of Atonement instead of Yom Kippor). While we both fasted and attended church twice for two services, we didn’t do other things, like the list of five items you mentioned. Eventually our church reformed and became more mainstream Christian. My husband and I also moved and joined a more Christian church. While I do so enjoy a more grace, Christ emphasized, and love filled church, instead of works based like the one I grew up with, there is a beauty and rhythm to keeping the Old Testament festivals that I miss. Each festival is also a reminder that focuses on a part of God’s plan of salvation, which was a good yearly reminder.

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *